Framing Migration: Our new blog

The Multicultural Germany Project blog is a project of the UC Berkeley Department of German in collaboration with others working in various fields of study and practice. In this space, the MGP brings together perspectives from different disciplines and backgrounds, all centered on themes of immigration/migration, race/ethnicity, minority experiences, and cultural exchange—hopefully, in a fun way.

The blog itself arose out of a graduate seminar called “Framing Migration” taught by Prof. Deniz Göktürk of the Department of German, which brought together a multidisciplinary group of contributors with specialties in Legal Studies, Performance Studies, Comparative Literature, and more, in addition to German Studies. Seminar participants wrote weekly blog posts on the course website reflecting on curricular and extracurricular materials, from feature films to museum exhibits, and relating those texts to their own scholarly and personal concerns.

As a result, not every post will have a direct connection to Germany or German-speaking societies: The through line is, rather, an engagement with topics that, regardless of their geographical and social specificity, have a bearing on multiple contexts, from the places where we were born to the places where we study to the places where we live.

Our new series of blog posts seeks to illuminate issues with relevance to contemporary debates about migration and immigration, drawing from and commenting on literature, cinema, performance, news media, academic scholarship, and other forms of cultural production.

If you’re interested in having your short (500-2000 word) blog post featured on the MGP blog, contact us via email at mcgermany@berkeley.edu with an idea or submission along with a short bio.

About Kumars Salehi

Kumars Salehi is a PhD student in German Literature and Culture. Broadly, he is interested in the relationships between media (primarily film, but also news media) and political consciousness. His research interests include Marxism; the Frankfurt School; German Idealism; and German and Scandinavian modernist/art cinema.
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